Book/Author Thread

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slooroo
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Post by slooroo » 1 month ago

My mother barely reads and likes nothing I like. My dad tells everyone the only book he's ever read is the New Testament.

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Post by Megan » 1 month ago

My mom likes to read just rarely has time. Same for my sister. My dad I don’t know how much he does. My brother mostly read comics though he did introduce me to the Myst book series.
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Post by slooroo » 1 month ago

It's fun sometimes to see what authors are listed as influences for other authors. Not really sure what my list would be.

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Post by slooroo » 1 month ago

I just finished The Wolf and The Watchman. If you can't handle very dark, gruesome books this won't be for you but the author did a pretty fascinating job I think. In one way it's a murder mystery but I think that's merely a smaller story in the bigger story Natt och Dag wants to tell of quickly changing world of Europe in 1793 and how new ideas and old grudges are mixing together to create this dark yet important chapter for world history. It's with this backdrop I became quickly fascinated and attached to all of the characters. Apparently this is going to be a trilogy and I'm curious to see how the author accomplishes that considering I thought he wrapped up the first book really well.

Next up is Mockingjay by Suzanne Collins so I'll finally be freaking done with The Hunger Games franchise and have a wide empty spot on my shelf. So far I think I liked the first book more in terms of ideas but the second book was better written in terms of flow.

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Post by Megan » 1 month ago

I loved The Hunger Games books. I should re-read them...someday.
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Post by slooroo » 1 month ago

Megan wrote:
1 month ago
I loved The Hunger Games books. I should re-read them...someday.
I'll have to read further into Mockingjay but Collins is such an odd writer experience to me. Her actual writing improves from each book but yet I feel like her ideas get more generic as it keeps going. Maybe Mockingjay can prove me wrong, we'll see.

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Post by slooroo » 1 month ago

I finished Mockingjay by Suzanne Collins. I'll shove my opinions in spoilers. Next up will be Hunger by Knut Hamsun.
Spoiler:
I feel like The Hunger Games trilogy serves as an example of why things don't always have to be trilogies. Mockingjay feels rushed and many plot points end on rather drab notes. The love triangle is pointless and I'm never convinced Katniss will ever pick Gale. President Snow and President Coin aren't expanded on enough to feel like villains with any presence. As much as I find Voldemort drab at least Rowling did a great job letting you really get in Voldemort's head on who he is and what he's going to do. We know so little about Snow and Coin they feel nonexistent. Also I really liked Johanna and just as soon as it felt like she would finally get character development suddenly she falls out of the story. The whole book just feels so janky. It's not bad and I'm glad I read it, I just think Collins needed two books to finish the story instead of just that one.
Also it just occurred to me to link my Goodreads.

https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/73410729-sladeuri

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Post by slooroo » 4 weeks ago

Finished Hunger by Knut Hamsun. Hamsun does a fascinating job depicting the constant downward spiral of a person suffering. I think it does help if you've read a work by Dostoyevsky first though simply because Hamsun wears his Dosto influence on his sleeve in this.

Next up will be The Practice of the Presence of God with Spiritual Maxims by Brother Lawrence. Been awhile since I've read anything religious and I find monks fascinating.

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Post by slooroo » 3 weeks ago

I finished Brother Lawrence's book yesterday and it was pretty good. Not really advanced theology or anything but I think his interest was more in giving simple ideas for laymen. I started The Trial by Franz Kafka today and I'm glad I read Hunger first because Kafka's inspiration from Hamsun is pretty heavy in a way with the very scattered feeling of how Kafka writes.

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Post by slooroo » 3 weeks ago

So I finished The Trial by Franz Kafka and I honestly hate that Kafka never finished this book. At the same time it's the choppy fragmented nature of the work that makes it so fascinating in another way. You want to know what Kafka would've done with these characters and scenarios if it was expanded on. There seems to be a shitload of interpretations of the book and I see the value of each one but I have to admit I wonder if The Trial isn't a tale of struggling with God and God's law. I also feel it may be religious due to Kafka noting Dostoyevsky as a brother and Dosto's works are super religious. At the same time I can also see the view of the horrors of bloated, corrupt bureaucracy and the lack of justice in such a system.

Next up shall be Ruthless: Scientology, My Son David Miscaviage, and Me by Ron Miscaviage. David Miscaviage is currently the leader of the Church of Scientology and a few years ago his father left the church and wrote this autobiography about the two of them. I've been really curious to read this for some time so now seems like a good time to tackle it.

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