Useful freeware

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Deleted User 136
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Useful freeware

Post by Deleted User 136 » 3 weeks ago

Just a collated list of free software for you. Feel free to suggest anything here that you want added.

This thread is specifically for programs running at least on one of the following: Windows, MacOS X, Linux, Windows (UWP)

Web Browsers
Firefox - Still reasonable but not its old self anymore. (Windows/MacOS/Linux)
Chromium - Open source basis for Chrome. (Windows/MacOS/Linux)
Tor Browser - Firefox fork with privacy focus. (Windows/MacOS/Linux)
Pale Moon - Fork of old Firefox with retained flexibility. (Windows/Linux)
Mypal - Patched fork of Pale Moon 28 for XP/Vista 32/64. (Windows)
Office Suites & Tools
LibreOffice - The successor to OpenOffice.org after Oracle’s garbage (Windows/MacOS/Linux)
WPS Office - Sort of commercial fork of LibreOffice with some cloud support stuff (??/Windows UWP)
Text/Code Editors
Image Editors
GIMP - PhotoShop but the learning curve went 322 times higher (Windows/MacOS/Linux)
paint.NET - Something simpler, like a middle ground of PS and drawing programs (Windows, Windows UWP)
Pinta - Mono-based cross platform software like paint.NET (Windows, MacOS, Linux)
Media Players & Codecs
K-Lite Codec Pack - No description (Windows)
foobar2000 - Plug-in/customisable based audio player (Windows)
Parole - Xfce’s media player (Linux)
Audio Compositing/Mixing
Audacity - No description (Windows/MacOS/Linux)
Famitracker - Proving the audio potential of Hummer Team’s 2A03 was much better than they knew (Windows)
IRC Clients
HexChat - Fork of old XChat (Windows, Linux)
XChat Azure - Fork of old XChat (MacOS)
Other IM Clients
Pidgin - Implementation for libpurple (Windows, MacOS, Linux)
Discord - Monopolistic drama machine tbh (Windows, MacOS, Linux)
System/Hardware Utilities
Etcher - ISO/image burner to USB, and one of the only good Electron stuff existing (Windows, MacOS, Linux)

-I’ll put links later, sorry I’m in a rush a little

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Yumika
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Useful freeware

Post by Yumika » 3 weeks ago

I recommend IceCat! It's literally the freetard Firefox fork.

Make sure your copy of Chromium is compiled without any trace of Google, otherwise referred to as Ungoogled Chromium.

Xfce comes with Mousepad as its default text editor. Anyone who liked Notepad++ for Winbloat$ could try Notepadqq on GNU/Linux. Vim and Nano are also useful.

KolourPaint is good for anyone who misses good ole MS Paint.

Mpv is the BEST audio/video player. It's so customizable for its lightweight packaging. Clementine is good for managing your music collection.

WeeChat should be on the list as another IRC client, but it's cli-based, too.

Discord may be "freeware", but it requires the use of a non-free client program. You can't see the source code of it, and the development team has a history of disrespecting your freedom. I would stay away from that one at all costs.

GNU/Linux Mint has its own USB writing and formatting programs, called Mintstick.
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Deleted User 136
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Post by Deleted User 136 » 3 weeks ago

Is IceCat available on Windows? I’m taking a quick shot that it’s debranded Firefox ESR or something along the likes of that, which sounds like a reasonably good thing to me. As for Chromium, can I ask you how to remove the Google crap during compilation time while keeping stuff like codecs in?

Well, Vim is useful if you wanna lock your computer screen on a pure console output. No one would be sure to get past VIM without doing more than messing up the text you had open... Nano on the other hand is pretty efficient to use for a command line tool. I used it often enough to keep hitting CTRL+O to save in other programs nowadays... XD (Mousepad is a good GUI editor too, I always found it quite simple enough to use)

Cool. Will definitely add when I can :)

Definitely heard good things about MPV. Will add it of course.

The best way to IRC is connect to an external server via SSH from a system on another OS and use a CLI IRC client, trust me I did that from my phone once XDD, but sure it will get added.

While obviously your post is targeted mainly at GNU/Linux, that’s a good thing for those wanting to do a dual boot and not knowing some almost drop in replacement programs. The info you mentioned is also pretty useful so I’ll be sure to include it in the post ^^

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Post by Yumika » 3 weeks ago

Yes, IceCat is available on multiple platforms. ^^

For Ungoogled Chromium, I would consult this GitHub for instructions on compiling. Alternatively, try out Iridium Browser. You only need to do ONE thing after installing it, and that's to uncheck "protect you and your device from dangerous sites" (in other words, disable Google Safe Browsing) in the advanced settings menu.
Without signing in to a Google Account, Chromium does pretty well in terms of security and privacy. However, Chromium still has some dependency on Google web services and binaries. In addition, Google designed Chromium to be easy and intuitive for users, which means they compromise on transparency and control of inner operations.

ungoogled-chromium addresses these issues in the following ways:

1. Remove all remaining background requests to any web services while building and running the browser
2. Remove all code specific to Google web services
3. Remove all uses of pre-made binaries from the source code, and replace them with user-provided alternatives when possible.
4. Disable features that inhibit control and transparency, and add or modify features that promote them (these changes will almost always require manual activation or enabling).

These features are implemented as configuration flags, patches, and custom scripts. For more details, consult the Design Documentation.
It depends on what you need a text editor for, as you may find yourself locked from a graphical session. Nano is a bit more flexible for a newbie, but Vim has lots of cool keybindings (there's an add-on for old Firefox and Pale Moon called Vimperator. Pentadactyl is another one I've heard of.

Yeah, Mpv is incredibly based. It transcribes accurate data, and is my go-to for streaming videos off YouTube, BitChute, and other platforms as such (you can even stream porn!). XD

I haven't done the SSH thing for IRC, but I bet that's pretty interesting! XD

Yeah, my post is mainly targeted towards GNU/Linux, but some of those pieces of software could also be used on crackOS or Winbloat$. I just think Ubuntu has plebized GNU/Linux to the point where there should be no excuses not to use it. Play muh vidya gaymz? There are native ports and Wine (supports DirectX 12 by now, but Vulkan is much better).
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Post by Deleted User 136 » 3 weeks ago

The real trouble I have with GNU/Linux from a new/average user perspective is just the fact that there’s a lot of fragmentation and lack of “backwards compatibility” focus which is why some people have to dual boot or don’t like it. It’s also kinda frustrating for me at least on a software design level when things are scattered all over the place or just don’t look consistent (this also annoys me about using Office 2003/2007/2010 on anything except XP/Vista/7 respectively per-version, since it doesn’t look right with the rest of the OS otherwise).

In regards to the compatibility problem, that’s specifically referring to the fact it’s usually fairly difficult finding updated configuration guides and solutions to annoying issues rather than anything else. If it was more easy finding good updated stuff in documentation then this comment would probably be mostly irrelevant. Linux does handle quite a bit of mid-2000s to early-2010s hardware better than Windows 10 does for sure :P

I’ll acknowledge the Linux kernel is incredibly stable and anyone relying on non-GNU/Linux for something like a company website or file share is out of their mind to be using Windows or whatever. For the average desktop user some things just feel confusing.

IMO it will gain a good amount of ground once enough companies are actually willing to provide proper support for at least the major distributions out there. Don’t forget the fact several good “indie” games do get GNU/Linux releases, it’s just the big names everyone’s heard of that are too stubborn these days.

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